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Sen. John McCain has died

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John Mccain who was the Republican Party’s nominee for president in 2008  and who was a United States Senator from Arizona since 1987 has died.
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Timeline

October 26, 1967 – March 14, 1973
During the Vietnam War, McCain is shot down and captured by North Vietnamese forces. He is held as a POW for more than five years.
1977-1981 Navy liaison to the US Senate.
1981 Retires from the US Navy.
1983-1987 US Representative from Arizona’s 1st District.
November 4, 1986 Wins the US Senate seat vacated by retiring Senator Barry Goldwater.
1989-1991 Is investigated as being one of five senators, called the Keating Five, who interfered with regulators on behalf of Charles Keating, a financier accused of financial violations and is convicted of securities fraud. McCain is cleared, but the Senate Ethics Committee decides that McCain showed poor judgment in his efforts for Keating, who was a large contributor to McCain’s campaign.
1990s As part of the Senate Select Committee on POW/MIA Affairs, McCain works with Democrats, including John Kerry, on normalizing relations and increasing trade with Vietnam.
November 3, 1992 Is re-elected to the Senate.
1993 – McCain has a melanoma lesion removed from his left shoulder. It is declared Stage 0, of little long-term concern.
November 3, 1998 Is re-elected to the Senate.
1999 – McCain’s memoir, “Faith of My Fathers,” is published.
September 27, 1999 Formally announces his presidential candidacy, while in New Hampshire.
March 9, 2000 Suspends his campaign for president.
May 9, 2000 Endorses George W. Bush for president.
August 19, 2000 – Undergoes more than five hours of surgery to remove two cancerous skin lesions on his temple and upper arm. The melanoma on his left arm is declared Stage 0, but the melanoma removed from McCain’s left lower temple proves invasive, though later dissection of dozens of lymph nodes shows no evidence that the cancer had spread.
February 4, 2002 – McCain undergoes surgery to remove a skin lesion from the left side of his nose that doctors later say is a low-risk, early stage or “in situ” melanoma.
September 2002 “Worth the Fighting for: A Memoir,” is published.
November 2, 2004 Is re-elected to the Senate for a fourth term.
February 28, 2007 – Appears on the “Late Show with David Letterman” and confirms that he will seek the Republican presidential nomination.
April 25, 2007 – While in New Hampshire, McCain announces he is running for president.
August 29, 2008 Announces that he has selected Governor Sarah Palin of Alaska to be his vice presidential running mate.
September 4, 2008 Accepts the Republican nomination for president at the Republican National Convention in St. Paul, Minnesota.
November 4, 2008 – Loses the presidential election to Senator Barack Obama.
November 2, 2010 Is re-elected to the Senate for a fifth term.
August 29, 2012 Speaks at the 2012 Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida, on his 76th birthday.
May 27, 2013 – Meets with rebels in Syria, making him the highest ranking elected official from the United States to visit since the conflict began in March 2011.
August 5, 2013 – At President Obama’s request, US Senators McCain and Lindsey Graham arrive in Cairo to meet with Egyptian interim leaders and separately, with the Muslim Brotherhood leadership.
December 14, 2013 – McCain meets with opposition leaders in Kiev, Ukraine, during protests in the country.
April 6, 2015 – Tells NBC News that he has decided to run for re-election in 2016.
November 8, 2016 – Wins his sixth term in the US Senate, defeating Democrat Ann Kirkpatrick.
February 2017 – Makes an official but unannounced trip to northern Syria to visit US forces.
July 15, 2017 – Mayo Clinic releases a statement that McCain had a blood clot removed from his left eye on July 14.
July 19, 2017 – Mayo Clinic doctors directly involved in the senator’s care tell CNN McCain has been diagnosed with a primary glioblastoma, a type of brain tumor. Lab results from last week’s surgery confirmed the presence of brain cancer associated with the blood clot.
July 25, 2017 – Returns to the Senate to cast his vote on a procedural step to advance Republicans’ plans to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

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Four U.S Troops Killed In Kabul Airport Attack

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4 U.S. soldiers have been killed and three others wounded in attacks on Kabul airport.

A U.S. official says several Marines were killed and a number of other American military were wounded Thursday in an attack on Kabul’s airport.

U.S. officials have said that information is still coming in and they are trying to determine exact numbers of casualties.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss ongoing military operations.

The Pentagon would not say what troops were involved but acknowledged that “a number of U.S. service members were killed.”

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Amazon’s palm print recognition raises concern among U.S. senators

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Three U.S. senators, including Democrat Amy Klobuchar who chairs the Senate Judiciary Committee’s antitrust panel, wrote a letter to Amazon.com Inc (AMZN.O) to express concern about its palm print recognition system, Klobuchar’s office said Friday.

Amazon began rolling out biometric technology at its Whole Foods stores around Seattle in April, letting shoppers pay for items with a scan of their palm. The system, called Amazon One, lets customers link a credit card to their palm print.  read more 

Klobuchar, who was joined by Senators Bill Cassidy, a Republican, and Jon Ossoff, a Democrat, expressed concern in the letter dated Thursday about both privacy and competition related to Amazon One.

“Our concerns about user privacy are heightened by evidence that Amazon shared voice data with third-party contractors and allegations that Amazon has violated biometric privacy laws,” the lawmakers wrote in the letter.

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WHO seeks to take political heat out of virus origins debate

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The World Health Organization said on Friday it was setting up a new group to trace the origins of the coronavirus, seeking to end what it called “political point scoring” that had hampered investigations.

The inability of the WHO to say where and how the virus began spreading has fuelled tensions among its members, particularly between China, where COVID-19 cases were first identified in Wuhan in late 2019, and the United States.

The WHO called for all governments to cooperate to accelerate studies into the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic and “to depoliticise the situation”.

It specified that a new advisory group called the International Scientific Advisory Group for Origins of Novel Pathogens would support “the rapid undertaking” of further studies.

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