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Ex-Minneapolis officer charged in George Floyd’s death is released from jail

One of the four former Minneapolis police officers awaiting trial in the death of George Floyd has been released on $750,000 bond.

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(CNN) — One of the four former Minneapolis police officers awaiting trial in the death of George Floyd has been released on $750,000 bond.

Thomas Lane, 37, was released Wednesday afternoon from the Hennepin County jail, the facility’s website reads.

Lane was one of four officers involved in arresting Floyd on Memorial Day on suspicion of using a counterfeit $20 bill. The arrest led to Floyd’s death, which has sparked global protests against racial injustice and police misconduct.

Bystander video shows then-Officer Derek Chauvin pressing his knee on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes as Floyd was on the ground outside a police vehicle.

Lane and another officer held down other parts of Floyd’s body, next to Chauvin, authorities said in a probable cause statement.

Floyd, after repeatedly saying he couldn’t breathe, became unresponsive. He was taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

Chauvin was charged with second-degree murder. Lane and the two other officers on the scene — Tou Thao and J. Alexander Kueng — have been charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder.

Lane’s attorney has said Lane, while Chauvin was pressing on Floyd’s neck, suggested more than once that they roll the Floyd to his side, but Chauvin declined.

“I am worried about excited delirium or whatever,” Lane said, according to authorities’ probable cause statement. “That’s why we have him on his stomach,” Chauvin replied, according to the document.

Lane had been on the police force for four days when Floyd died and was “doing everything he thought he was supposed to do as a four-day police officer,” his attorney, Earl Gray, told CNN this week.

The Hennepin County medical examiner’s officeconcluded the manner of Floyd’s death was homicide and that the cause was “cardiopulmonary arrest complicating law enforcement subdual, restraint, and neck compression.” Cardiopulmonary arrest means Floyd’s heart failed.

A different autopsy, conducted by experts hired by Floyd’s family, concluded Floyd died of “asphyxiation from sustained pressure” when his neck and back were compressed. The pressure cut off blood flow to his brain, that autopsy determined.

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Four U.S Troops Killed In Kabul Airport Attack

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4 U.S. soldiers have been killed and three others wounded in attacks on Kabul airport.

A U.S. official says several Marines were killed and a number of other American military were wounded Thursday in an attack on Kabul’s airport.

U.S. officials have said that information is still coming in and they are trying to determine exact numbers of casualties.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss ongoing military operations.

The Pentagon would not say what troops were involved but acknowledged that “a number of U.S. service members were killed.”

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Amazon’s palm print recognition raises concern among U.S. senators

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Three U.S. senators, including Democrat Amy Klobuchar who chairs the Senate Judiciary Committee’s antitrust panel, wrote a letter to Amazon.com Inc (AMZN.O) to express concern about its palm print recognition system, Klobuchar’s office said Friday.

Amazon began rolling out biometric technology at its Whole Foods stores around Seattle in April, letting shoppers pay for items with a scan of their palm. The system, called Amazon One, lets customers link a credit card to their palm print.  read more 

Klobuchar, who was joined by Senators Bill Cassidy, a Republican, and Jon Ossoff, a Democrat, expressed concern in the letter dated Thursday about both privacy and competition related to Amazon One.

“Our concerns about user privacy are heightened by evidence that Amazon shared voice data with third-party contractors and allegations that Amazon has violated biometric privacy laws,” the lawmakers wrote in the letter.

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WHO seeks to take political heat out of virus origins debate

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The World Health Organization said on Friday it was setting up a new group to trace the origins of the coronavirus, seeking to end what it called “political point scoring” that had hampered investigations.

The inability of the WHO to say where and how the virus began spreading has fuelled tensions among its members, particularly between China, where COVID-19 cases were first identified in Wuhan in late 2019, and the United States.

The WHO called for all governments to cooperate to accelerate studies into the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic and “to depoliticise the situation”.

It specified that a new advisory group called the International Scientific Advisory Group for Origins of Novel Pathogens would support “the rapid undertaking” of further studies.

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